John Clare

John Clare (1793-1864), Poet

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Bio Dates
Birth Year: 
1793
Death Year: 
1864
Cause of Death: 

John Clare's Publications

Title Publication Date Publisher Edition Other Editions Editor Collaborator Patron Subscription Description Key Subscribers Pages Call Number Dialect Language Digitized or Digital Editions Additional Notes
Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery 1820 Taylor & Hessey, E. Drury
Edition: 
4
Publication Date: 
1821
Other Information: 
"Clare's first book, Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery, was published by Taylor and Hessey in 1820 and reached a fourth edition in 1821, largely owing to the efforts of William Waldegrave, first Baron Radstock, and his evangelical friend Mrs Eliza Emmerson." (ODNB)
John Taylor (1781-1864) William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock, Eliza Emmerson Northamptonshire Archive.org
The Village Minstrel 1821 Taylor & Hessey John Taylor (1781-1864) Northamptonshire Google Books
The Shepherd’s Calendar ; with village stories, and other poems 1827 John Taylor John Taylor (1781-1864) Northamptonshire Archive.org
The Rural Muse 1835 G. & W. B. Whittaker Northamptonshire Archive.org

Personal Map

Relationships

Source Relationship Type Target Description View
James Dacres Devlin supported, addressed writing to John Clare

Simon Kövesi has traced Devlin’s notable role in the 1841 campaign to raise support and funding for John Clare, then languishing in an asylum in High Beach, through a series of essays and poems pub. in the English Journal. Kövesi reproduces the poem, ‘A Reflection, on reading the appeal, in behalf of the poet John Clare in the “English Journal” May 15’ (first printed in the Journal, 1, no. 23, 5 June 1841), along with its extended footnote comparing Clare with Robert BurnsRobert Bloomfield and Thomas Chatterton.

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William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock patronized John Clare View
Eliza Emmerson patronized John Clare View
John Clare knew Charles Lamb

Clare "had attended [John] Taylor's soirées, met Coleridge, Hazlitt, Cunningham, Lamb, Cary, and other important literary figures. He had become the drinking companion of E. V. Rippingille, the painter, and had visited several of the great artists of the day. He corresponded with George Darley, Thomas Pringle, James Montgomery, Sir Charles Elton, and others." (ODNB)

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John Clare knew Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Clare "had attended [John] Taylor's soirées, met Coleridge, Hazlitt, Cunningham, Lamb, Cary, and other important literary figures. He had become the drinking companion of E. V. Rippingille, the painter, and had visited several of the great artists of the day. He corresponded with George Darley, Thomas Pringle, James Montgomery, Sir Charles Elton, and others." (ODNB)

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Allan Cunningham friends with John Clare View
T. Wright addressed writing to John Clare

Wright wrote a poem to John Clare in ‘Standard Habbie’ metre, in January 1821, ‘To the Helpstone Poet’ (‘Like Shakespeare, Clare, thou’rt Nature’s child’). He says in it that ‘like thee, I’ve not the art’.

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Oliver Grindall addressed writing to John Clare

Grindall sent a verse-letter to John Clare, beginning "Bard of nature, thee I greet" on 10 February 1821, and wrote to him again on 16 October 1821. These letters are in BL Egerton MS 2245, ff. 283, 370.

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Robert Bloomfield read John Clare

"Bloomfield found some happiness in the final year of his life through a reawakened interest in John Clare's poetry" (ODNB)

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Thomas Pringle read by, corresponded with, collaborated with John Clare

Pringle published Clare's poems in the annual Friendship's Offering, which he edited.

Clare owned Pringle's Ephemerides or Occasional Poems, written in Scotland and South Africa (London, 1828).

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Allan Cunningham friends with John Clare View
Edward Bailey Preston corresponded with John Clare View