Stephen Duck

Portrait - npg 4493; stephen duck

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Bio Dates
Birth Year: 
1705
Death Year: 
1756
Cause of Death: 
Death Description: 

his death was originally ascribed to natural causes, but it was later rumoured that he committed suicide due to depression

Stephen Duck's Publications

Title Publication Date Publisher Edition Other Editions Editor Collaborator Patron Subscription Description Key Subscribers Pages Call Number Dialect Language Digitized or Digital Editions Additional Notes
Poems on Several Occasions 1736
Edition: 
3
Location: 
Publication Date: 
1738

Personal Map

Relationships

Source Relationship Type Target Description View
Robert Tatersal influenced by, addressed writing to Stephen Duck

Tatersal wrote The bricklayer’s miscellany: or, poems on several subjects: written by Robert Tatersal, A poor Country Bricklayer, of Kingston upon Thames, in Allusion to Stephen Duck (1734) after Duck's success with "The Thresher's Labour." Tatersal's sense of debt to Duck for making it possible for laborers to aspire to a literary career is made explicit in a poem addressed to Duck: “The Bricklayers Labours” charts his working life in the sort of vivid detail Duck had used in describing his work as a thresher (Blackwell).

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Stephen Duck read by, dismissed, knew Alexander Pope

Duck "had a personality which attracted those who met him; his simple uprightness and naïve charm won a measure of personal liking from even such harsh judges as Pope and Swift, neither of whom had a kind word for him as a poet" (ODNB).

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Stephen Duck dismissed by, knew, read by Jonathan Swift

Duck "had a personality which attracted those who met him; his simple uprightness and naïve charm won a measure of personal liking from even such harsh judges as Pope and Swift, neither of whom had a kind word for him as a poet" (ODNB). Swift also subscribed to Duck's first authorized publication, Poems On Several Occasions (1736).

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Stephen Duck patronized by Queen Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline (Caroline of Ansbach)

"In early October 1730 Duck travelled to Windsor to be presented to the queen. ... Duck was well received by the queen, who gave him an annuity of £30 or £50 and a house. In 1733 she made him a yeoman of the guard, and in 1735 keeper of the queen's library in Merlin's Cave, a Gothic building in Richmond Gardens, a post he filled with diligence and taste." (ODNB)

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John Banks of Bancks imitated Stephen Duck

Banks of Bancks wrote The Weaver's Miscellany in imitation of Stephen Duck

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