addressed writing to

Robert Tatersal and Stephen Duck

Tatersal wrote The bricklayer’s miscellany: or, poems on several subjects: written by Robert Tatersal, A poor Country Bricklayer, of Kingston upon Thames, in Allusion to Stephen Duck (1734) after Duck's success with "The Thresher's Labour." Tatersal's sense of debt to Duck for making it possible for laborers to aspire to a literary career is made explicit in a poem addressed to Duck: “The Bricklayers Labours” charts his working life in the sort of vivid detail Duck had used in describing his work as a thresher (

Joseph Cronshaw and Ben Brierley

Behind Cronshaw's volume, Dingle Cottage, there is a tremendous sense of pride in regional writing, presided over by three spirits from the previous generation, the poets Edwin Waugh, Samuel Laycock and Ben Brierley (qqv), who are regularly namechecked in the preliminary materials. Indeed, one mixed prose-verse piece, ‘A Strange Dream’, uses the dream motif to discuss the consider of reading these three hallowed Lancashire dialect poets, and to underline this, handsome photographic portraits of each of them with names and vital dates, are interleafed with the poem (156-63).

Joseph Cronshaw and Samuel Laycock

Behind Cronshaw's volume, Dingle Cottage, there is a tremendous sense of pride in regional writing, presided over by three spirits from the previous generation, the poets Edwin Waugh, Samuel Laycock and Ben Brierley (qqv), who are regularly namechecked in the preliminary materials. Indeed, one mixed prose-verse piece, ‘A Strange Dream’, uses the dream motif to discuss the consider of reading these three hallowed Lancashire dialect poets, and to underline this, handsome photographic portraits of each of them with names and vital dates, are interleafed with the poem (156-63).

Joseph Cronshaw and Edwin Waugh

Behind Cronshaw's volume, Dingle Cottage, there is a tremendous sense of pride in regional writing, presided over by three spirits from the previous generation, the poets Edwin Waugh, Samuel Laycock and Ben Brierley (qqv), who are regularly namechecked in the preliminary materials. Indeed, one mixed prose-verse piece, ‘A Strange Dream’, uses the dream motif to discuss the consider of reading these three hallowed Lancashire dialect poets, and to underline this, handsome photographic portraits of each of them with names and vital dates, are interleafed with the poem (156-63).