Relationships

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Title Source Relationship Type Target Description
Mary Leapor and Alexander Pope Mary Leapor influenced by, read Alexander Pope

"Much of [Leapor's] work is modelled on that of Alexander Pope, whose work she intensely admired" (Wikipedia).

Mary Leapor and Jonathan Swift Mary Leapor influenced by, read Jonathan Swift

"Jonathan Swift, particularly his anti-blason poetry (the de-emphasis on the female physical body in relation to nature), was also a model" for Leapor's writing (Wikipedia).

Nathaniel Curzon (Lord Scarsdale) and Mary Peach Collier (1799-1858) Nathaniel Curzon (Lord Scarsdale) patronized Mary Peach Collier (1799-1858)

Collier dedicated Poetic Effusions (1835, 2nd ed) to Scarsdale and describes this as a "distinguished and illustrious patronage"; the frontispiece is a "sketch of the antique Church adjoining your Lordship's magnificent mansion"

Oliver Grindall and John Clare Oliver Grindall addressed writing to John Clare

Grindall sent a verse-letter to John Clare, beginning "Bard of nature, thee I greet" on 10 February 1821, and wrote to him again on 16 October 1821. These letters are in BL Egerton MS 2245, ff. 283, 370.

Percy Shelley and Thomas Chatterton Percy Shelley influenced by, wrote about Thomas Chatterton

"Chatterton's genius and his death are commemorated by Percy Bysshe Shelley in Adonais (though its main emphasis is the commemoration of Keats)" (Wikipedia)

Robert Bloomfield and James Thomson Robert Bloomfield read, influenced by James Thomson (1700-1748 NPF)

About 1783 ... Robert and George decamped and took up residence at Blue Hart Court, Bell Alley. Another lodger there, James Kay, generously lent Robert a number of books, among them Paradise Lost and James Thomson's The Seasons, the latter of which became his favourite reading material. Over the years Bloomfield developed a prodigious memory for poetry and could recite any passage from The Seasons or Thomson's The Castle of Indolence ...

Robert Bloomfield and John Clare Robert Bloomfield read John Clare

"Bloomfield found some happiness in the final year of his life through a reawakened interest in John Clare's poetry" (ODNB)

Robert Bloomfield and John Milton Robert Bloomfield read John Milton

About 1783 ... Robert and George decamped and took up residence at Blue Hart Court, Bell Alley. Another lodger there, James Kay generously lent Robert a number of books, among them Paradise Lost ... (ODNB)

Robert Bloomfield and Robert Burns Robert Bloomfield read, influenced by Robert Burns

Over the years Bloomfield developed a prodigious memory for poetry and could recite any passage from The Seasons or Thomson's The Castle of Indolence, as well as large swathes of Burns. (ODNB)

Robert Sewell and Robert Bloomfield Robert Sewell addressed writing to Robert Bloomfield
Robert Sewell and Robert Burns Robert Sewell addressed writing to Robert Burns

Sewell pub. An Essay in Rhyme, in two parts (Halsted: M. King, 1834), which contains "To Burns"

Robert Southey and James Hogg Robert Southey addressed writing to, corresponded with James Hogg

Several letters between Hogg and Southey are available at Romantic Circles in The Collected Letters of Robert Southey.

Hogg wrote poetic parodies of major poets (including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Wilson, Southey, and himself) in The Poetic Mirror (1816) (ODNB; Murray, 1904, p. 116).

Robert Tannahill and Robert Burns Robert Tannahill influenced by, addressed writing to Robert Burns

Tannahill wrote dialect poems inspired by Burns from approximately 1800-1810. He addressed several odes in Burns' memory for Burns Suppers, and helped found and was the first secretary of the Paisley Burns Club.

Robert Tatersal and Stephen Duck Robert Tatersal influenced by, addressed writing to Stephen Duck

Tatersal wrote The bricklayer’s miscellany: or, poems on several subjects: written by Robert Tatersal, A poor Country Bricklayer, of Kingston upon Thames, in Allusion to Stephen Duck (1734) after Duck's success with "The Thresher's Labour." Tatersal's sense of debt to Duck for making it possible for laborers to aspire to a literary career is made explicit in a poem addressed to Duck: “The Bricklayers Labours” charts his working life in the sort of vivid detail Duck had used in describing his work as a thresher (Blackwell).

Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Thomas Chatterton Samuel Taylor Coleridge read, influenced by, addressed writing to Thomas Chatterton

Chatterton's genius and his death are commemorated by ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 'Monody on the Death of Chatterton' " (Wikipedia)

Stephen Duck and Alexander Pope Stephen Duck read by, dismissed, knew Alexander Pope

Duck "had a personality which attracted those who met him; his simple uprightness and naïve charm won a measure of personal liking from even such harsh judges as Pope and Swift, neither of whom had a kind word for him as a poet" (ODNB).

Stephen Duck and Jonathan Swift Stephen Duck dismissed by, knew, read by Jonathan Swift

Duck "had a personality which attracted those who met him; his simple uprightness and naïve charm won a measure of personal liking from even such harsh judges as Pope and Swift, neither of whom had a kind word for him as a poet" (ODNB). Swift also subscribed to Duck's first authorized publication, Poems On Several Occasions (1736).

Stephen Duck and Queen Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline (Caroline of Ansbach) Stephen Duck patronized by Queen Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline (Caroline of Ansbach)

"In early October 1730 Duck travelled to Windsor to be presented to the queen. ... Duck was well received by the queen, who gave him an annuity of £30 or £50 and a house. In 1733 she made him a yeoman of the guard, and in 1735 keeper of the queen's library in Merlin's Cave, a Gothic building in Richmond Gardens, a post he filled with diligence and taste." (ODNB)

T. Wright and John Clare T. Wright addressed writing to John Clare

Wright wrote a poem to John Clare in ‘Standard Habbie’ metre, in January 1821, ‘To the Helpstone Poet’ (‘Like Shakespeare, Clare, thou’rt Nature’s child’). He says in it that ‘like thee, I’ve not the art’.

Thomas Cooper and Charles Kingsley Thomas Cooper written about by Charles Kingsley

Cooper’s "life, and to a lesser extend his works, were raided and reconstructed by [Charles] Kingsley for his social-problem novel Alton Locke: Tailor and Poet (1850)." (Sales 2002)

Thomas Mounsey (Mouncey) Cunningham and Robert Burns Thomas Mounsey Cunningham influenced by Robert Burns

Cunningham wrote ‘The Hills o' Gallowa’, one of his most popular songs, which has been attributed by some to Burns

Thomas Pringle and James Hogg Thomas Pringle corresponded with, collaborated with James Hogg

Pringle published poems by and corresponded with James Hogg when he co-edited the Edinburgh Monthly Magazine, the short-lived predecessor to the famous Blackwoods Magazine.

Thomas Pringle and John Clare Thomas Pringle read by, corresponded with, collaborated with John Clare

Pringle published Clare's poems in the annual Friendship's Offering, which he edited.

Clare owned Pringle's Ephemerides or Occasional Poems, written in Scotland and South Africa (London, 1828).

Thomas Pringle and Samuel Taylor Coleridge Thomas Pringle read by, influenced by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Coleridge admired Pringle's "Afar in the Desert" (1832)

William Laidlaw and James Hogg William Laidlaw written about by James Hogg

Laidlaw was described in Hogg's memoir

William Laidlaw and Sir Walter Scott William Laidlaw knew, amanuensis for Sir Walter Scott

Laidlaw was Scott's land-steward and amanuensis

William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock and John Clare William Waldegrave, 1st Baron Radstock patronized John Clare
William Wordsworth and James Hogg William Wordsworth addressed writing to, addressed in writing by, mutual influence James Hogg

"Wordsworth's 1835 'Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg', written in the year of [Hogg's] death, includes the lines:
'The mighty Minstrel breathes no longer,
'Mid mouldering ruins low he lies;
And death upon the braes of Yarrow,
Has closed the Shepherd-poet's eyes.'
This eulogy notwithstanding, Wordsworth's notes state 'He was undoubtedly a man of original genius, but of coarse manners and low and offensive opinions.' " (Wikipedia)

Hogg wrote poetic parodies of major poets (including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Scott, Wilson, Southey, and himself) in The Poetic Mirror (1816). (ODNB; Murray, 1904, p. 116)

William Wordsworth and Thomas Chatterton William Wordsworth read, influenced by, wrote about Thomas Chatterton

"Chatterton's genius and his death are commemorated by ...by William Wordsworth in 'Resolution and Independence' " (Wikipedia)

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